Fluorescence And The Color Of Day Glo Paints

Susan Houde-Walter

To the casual observer, a white piece of paper seems white whether viewed at dawn, noon, or dusk. In contrast, fine arts painters must compare the colors of their paint mixtures to the scene they are viewing. They recognize that the actual color of an object depends as much on the color of the light used for illumination as it does on the nature of the object. The effect is most obvious with objects that appear white or yellow in sunlight and some of the new "Day Glo" colors (especially the "Saturn" and "Arc" yellows).

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Fluorescence And The Color Of Day Glo Paints

Susan Houde-Walter

To the casual observer, a white piece of paper seems white whether viewed at dawn, noon, or dusk. In contrast, fine arts painters must compare the colors of their paint mixtures to the scene they are viewing. They recognize that the actual color of an object depends as much on the color of the light used for illumination as it does on the nature of the object. The effect is most obvious with objects that appear white or yellow in sunlight and some of the new "Day Glo" colors (especially the "Saturn" and "Arc" yellows).

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Publish Date: 01 March 1992


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