Fiber Optic Sensors For Intravascular Monitoring

Amos Gottlieb

It is often imperative in the treatment and management of critically ill patients to know the pH of the blood plasma and the concentration of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood. These analytes are collectively referred to as the "blood gases." The conventional method for determining blood gas values involves drawing a sample of blood from the patient, transporting it to a centralized laboratory, and using an electrochemical blood gas analyzer to measure its pH, oxygen partial pressure (P02), and carbon dioxide partial pressure (PC02).

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Fiber Optic Sensors For Intravascular Monitoring

Amos Gottlieb

It is often imperative in the treatment and management of critically ill patients to know the pH of the blood plasma and the concentration of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood. These analytes are collectively referred to as the "blood gases." The conventional method for determining blood gas values involves drawing a sample of blood from the patient, transporting it to a centralized laboratory, and using an electrochemical blood gas analyzer to measure its pH, oxygen partial pressure (P02), and carbon dioxide partial pressure (PC02).

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Publish Date: 01 October 1992


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