Quasi-Phasematched Optical Parametric Oscillators in Periodically Poled LiNbO3

L.E. Myers, M.L. Bortz, M.A. Arbore, R.C. Eckardt, M.M. Fejer, and R.L. Byer, Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif., and W.R. Bosenberg, Lightwave Electronics Corp., Mountain View, Calif.

Quasi-phasematching (QPM) is an alternative to birefringent phasematching that is especially useful for optical parametric oscillators (OPOs). QPM can be implemented in ferroelectrics, such as LiNbO3, by building into the crystal a grating of domain-reversed regions. Because the grating is controlled by the design of a lithographic mask, phasematching can be achieved independent of inherent material properties. Thus, QPM permits non-critical phasematching of any wavelength at any temperature, within the transparency range of the material. In addition, QPM interactions can use the largest element of the nonlinear susceptibility.

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Quasi-Phasematched Optical Parametric Oscillators in Periodically Poled LiNbO3

L.E. Myers, M.L. Bortz, M.A. Arbore, R.C. Eckardt, M.M. Fejer, and R.L. Byer, Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, Calif., and W.R. Bosenberg, Lightwave Electronics Corp., Mountain View, Calif.

Quasi-phasematching (QPM) is an alternative to birefringent phasematching that is especially useful for optical parametric oscillators (OPOs). QPM can be implemented in ferroelectrics, such as LiNbO3, by building into the crystal a grating of domain-reversed regions. Because the grating is controlled by the design of a lithographic mask, phasematching can be achieved independent of inherent material properties. Thus, QPM permits non-critical phasematching of any wavelength at any temperature, within the transparency range of the material. In addition, QPM interactions can use the largest element of the nonlinear susceptibility.

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Publish Date: 01 December 1995


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