Striving For The Ultimate Image

Ken Baker and Hugh Murray

At seven a.m. on a cold winter Sunday in Toronto, a large truck and several cars pull up at a suburban swimming pool. Out of the truck comes all the paraphernalia of the movie business: lights, scaffolding, boxes full of camera accessories, a large white crate containing the one and only IMAX SOLIDO 3-D camera, and a large plywood box—its outsides gleaming with many coats of resin and sporting a bulbous acrylic dome as a window on one of its sides.

This article is only available as a PDF.

Download PDF

Publish Date:

Striving For The Ultimate Image

Ken Baker and Hugh Murray

At seven a.m. on a cold winter Sunday in Toronto, a large truck and several cars pull up at a suburban swimming pool. Out of the truck comes all the paraphernalia of the movie business: lights, scaffolding, boxes full of camera accessories, a large white crate containing the one and only IMAX SOLIDO 3-D camera, and a large plywood box—its outsides gleaming with many coats of resin and sporting a bulbous acrylic dome as a window on one of its sides.

Log in or Become a member to view the full text of this article.

This article may be available for purchase via the search at Optica Publishing Group.

Optica Members get the full text of Optics & Photonics News, plus a variety of other member benefits.

Publish Date: 01 June 1993


Add a Comment

Share this Article

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT