The mystery of frequency doubling in optical fibers: Seeing glass in a new light

Victor Mizrahi and J.E. Sipe

In the fall of 1985, two graduate students at the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden were launching intense infrared light pulses from a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.064 μm into a standard telecommunications fiber. Embarked on a program" to investigate nonlinear optical phenomena in fibers, these young researchers chanced upon one of the most curious of all nonlinear optical effects—an effect that is still largely unexplained.

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The mystery of frequency doubling in optical fibers: Seeing glass in a new light

Victor Mizrahi and J.E. Sipe

In the fall of 1985, two graduate students at the Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden were launching intense infrared light pulses from a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1.064 μm into a standard telecommunications fiber. Embarked on a program" to investigate nonlinear optical phenomena in fibers, these young researchers chanced upon one of the most curious of all nonlinear optical effects—an effect that is still largely unexplained.

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Publish Date: 01 January 1991


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