Science and competitiveness

Thomas P. Rona

Basic science should be pursued for its own sake, as a characteristic cultural attribute of human society. The benefits are far broader than just economic advantage, although it is true that science is a rich source of inspiration and stimulus for inventiveness. But much more than the traditional pursuits of basic science is needed for true international competitiveness: extend its concerns to problems of global stability and couple its results to a vertically integrated process aimed at developing products and services for the international marketplace.

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Science and competitiveness

Thomas P. Rona

Basic science should be pursued for its own sake, as a characteristic cultural attribute of human society. The benefits are far broader than just economic advantage, although it is true that science is a rich source of inspiration and stimulus for inventiveness. But much more than the traditional pursuits of basic science is needed for true international competitiveness: extend its concerns to problems of global stability and couple its results to a vertically integrated process aimed at developing products and services for the international marketplace.

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Publish Date: 01 January 1990


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