A Different Kind of Kaleidoscope

Most kaleidoscopes work by forming multiple reflections, at various orientations, of a pattern at their input surface. Described here is a kaleidoscope, in which the entrance is uniformly illuminated, and a pattern results from changes in polarization produced by the reflections themselves. One form consists of four pieces of front surface mirror combined to give a square internally reflecting tube.

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