Afterimages and Multiplexing

There is much current interest in the functions of parallel pathways in vision and, in particular, the question of where and how the opponent-color and luminance signals are formed. According to several lines of evidence, chromatic and achromatic signals both share a common pathway from the retina to the brain; namely, the "sustained" or parvocellular pathway. Our recent results imply that the same multiplexing arrangement also holds for chromatic and achromatic afterimages, surely the most "sustained" phenomena in normal vision.

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Afterimages and Multiplexing

There is much current interest in the functions of parallel pathways in vision and, in particular, the question of where and how the opponent-color and luminance signals are formed. According to several lines of evidence, chromatic and achromatic signals both share a common pathway from the retina to the brain; namely, the "sustained" or parvocellular pathway. Our recent results imply that the same multiplexing arrangement also holds for chromatic and achromatic afterimages, surely the most "sustained" phenomena in normal vision.

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