Dark Energy Telescope Goes Deep

For the next five years, the 570-megapixel Dark Energy Camera, will be used to scan the depths of space for signs of dark energy.

For the next five years, the 570-megapixel Dark Energy Camera, built by the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Ill., U.S.A., will be used to scan the depths of space for signs of dark energy. Dark energy, which makes up about 74 percent of the universe, is the name given to the force that’s counteracting gravity, causing the accelerated expansion of the universe.

The camera is located inside the Victor M. Blanco telescope at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile’s Atacama desert. For the next five years, it will map out cosmic bodies 8 billion light years from Earth. The images will aid astronomers in calculating the current and past expansion rates of the universe.

Astronomers think that the camera could identify about 300 million galaxies, 100,000 galaxy clusters and 4,000 exploding stars, as well as unravel some of the mysteries behind the expanding universe.

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Dark Energy Telescope Goes Deep

For the next five years, the 570-megapixel Dark Energy Camera, will be used to scan the depths of space for signs of dark energy.

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